The Lancet Countdown on Health and Climate Change

by Arturo Herrera on November 28, 2016

The Lancet  Thu, Dec 22, 2016 1:15 PM – 2:45 PM EST

The Lancet Countdown on Health and Climate Change is an international, multidisciplinary research collaboration between academic institutions and practitioners across the world.

Announced at COP 22, the Lancet Countdown will track progress on health and climate change. It follows on from the work of the 2015 Lancet Commission, which concluded that the response to climate change could be “the greatest global health opportunity of the 21st century”. The Lancet Countdown will develop indicators to track the world’s response to climate change, and the health benefits that result.The Lancet Countdown will actively seek to engage with existing monitoring processes, such as the UN Sustainable Development Goals and World Health Organization’s climate and health country profiles. The indicators will also evolve over time through ongoing collaboration with experts and a range of stakeholders, and be dependent on the emergence of new evidence and knowledge. This is especially relevant to the public health practitioner and public health research communities, because of the collaborative nature of the initiative.Join Island Press, the Public Health Institute and the Security and Sustainability Forum for the US introduction of The Lancet Countdown.

PANELISTS

Hugh Montgomery Hugh Montgomery

Hugh Montgomery is a Professor of Intensive Care Medicine, UCL, the Director of the UCL Institute for Human Health and Performance, and Consultant Intensivist at Whittington Hospital. He has extensive experience in the impact of environmental stressors on human health and has a particular interest in the effects of climate change on human health.

Peter Byass Peter Byass

 

Peter Byass is a Professor of Global Health at the University of Umeå and is the Director of the Umeå Centre for Global Health Research. He has unique expertise in global health, examining the relationships and synergies between sustainable development and climate change with global health.
Jonathon Patz Jonathon Patz

 

 

Jonathan Patz  is director of the Global Health Institute at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. For 15 years Patz served as a lead author for the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (or IPCC).  He also co-­chaired the health expert panel of the U.S. National Assessment on Climate Change, a report mandated by the U.S. Congress.

John M. Balbus John M. Balbus

John M. Balbus, M.D., M.P.H., serves as a senior advisor to the Director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences on public health issues and as NIEHS’ liaison to its external constituencies, stakeholders, and advocacy groups. He also leads NIEHS efforts on climate change and human health.

 

 

 

Linda Rudolph Linda Rudolph

The webinar will be moderated by Linda Rudolph, the Director for the Center for Climate Change and Health, Public Health Institute. Linda was the founding chair of the California Health in All Policies Task Force, and of the California Climate Action Team Public Health Work Group.

Join Island Press, the Public Health Institute and the Security and Sustainability Forum for the US introduction of Countdown.
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Why Companies Should Care About Biodiversity

by Arturo Herrera on November 19, 2016

 

Framing a New Webinar on Biodiversity and Corporate Sustainability http://bit.ly/2fpW5sZ – January 18, 2016 1:15 to 2:45 PM EST

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Corporations engage in sustainable practices for reasons beyond creating a positive public image. Sustainability practices can also improve profitability and help them comply with emerging regulations. Many companies look outside their own doors for help in making smart choices and maximizing the impact of those choices.

 

Join SSF and Arizona State University’s School of Sustainability in a free webinar about how biodiversity thinking benefits companies. The session will be led by Leah Gerber, Director of the Center for Biodiversity Outcomes at The Center brings together individuals and groups – from academia, nonprofit, policy and corporate sectors – to achieve common goals of conservation biodiversity and sustainable management of natural resources in the 21st century.

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Registration is open and additional panelists will be announced over the next few weeks.
Restoring the Carbon Budget is the Critical Challenge of our Time
The pace of climate change means removing CO2 directly from the air may be inevitable to meet climate goals!

Leah Gerber Leah Gerbet

The capacity of the Earth’s atmosphere to safely hold excess carbon without too much warming is limited. The situation is growing more urgent. Even after the December 2015 Climate Conference in Paris, the pace to transform economies away from dumping fossil carbon into the atmosphere will likely be too slow to achieve the goal of holding the temperature increase to two degrees Celsius.

Unless that pace is dramatically accelerated, the planet will almost certainly exceed its “carbon budget” within two decades, if it hasn’t already. This concern has led the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to conclude that Negative Emissions Technologies (NETs), which remove CO2 from the air, will be needed to meet climate goals.

However, NETs are still in the research, development or demonstration stages of commercialization and may not be ready in time, or feasible at the necessary scale. That poses a conundrum. Technologies cannot develop without policy drivers; policy cannot lead the way without the assurance of demonstrably affordable and scalable technologies.

Join Arizona State University’ Global institute of Sustainability and the Security and Sustainability Forum in the first of a three-part series where leading experts will address the research, policies, economics and accountability needed to “Restore the Carbon Budget”.

Session 1 Panelists include: Jeffrey Sachs, world-renowned professor of economics, leader in sustainable development senior UN advisor, bestselling author, syndicated columnist and former Director of Columbia University’s Earth Institute and Kevin Anderson, Professor of Energy and Climate Change in the School of Mechanical, Aeronautical and Civil Engineering at the University of Manchester. Kevin recently finished a two-year position as director of the Tyndall Centre. David Biello, Science Curator at Ted Talks and former Scientific American Energy and Environment Editor, will moderate the session.

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Restoring the Carbon Balance

by Arturo Herrera on November 7, 2016

Arizona State University to Host a Three Webinar Series on “Restoring the Carbon Budget”   December 15, 2016 -1:00 pm to 2:30 pm EST  http://bit.ly/2fhqvxM
 The capacity of the Earth’s atmosphere to safely hold excess carbon without too much warming is  limited. The situation is growing more urgent. Even after the December 2015 Climate Conference in Paris, the pace to transform economies away from dumping fossil carbon into the atmosphere will likely be too slow to achieve the goal of holding the temperature increase to two degrees Celsius.
Unless that pace is dramatically accelerated, the planet will almost certainly  exceed its “carbon budget” within two decades, if it hasn’t already. This concern has led the   International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to conclude that Negative Emissions Technologies (NETs), which remove CO2 from the air, will be needed to meet climate  goals.
However, NETs are still in the research, development or demonstration stages of commercialization and may not be ready in time, or feasible at the necessary scale. That poses a conundrum.  Technologies cannot develop without policy drivers; policy cannot lead the way without the assurance of demonstrably affordable and scalable technologies. 

Join Arizona State University’ Global institute of Sustainability and the Security and Sustainability Forum in the first of a  three-part series where leading experts will address the research, policies, economics and accountability needed to  “Restore the Carbon Budget”.

Jefffrey Sachs Jefffrey Sachs
Session 1 Panelists include: Jeffrey Sachs, world-renowned professor of economics, leader in sustainable development senior UN advisor, bestselling author, syndicated columnist and former Director of Columbia University’s Earth Institute and Kevin Anderson, Professor of Energy and Climate Change in the School of Mechanical, Aeronautical and Civil Engineering at the University of Manchester. Kevin recently finished a two-year position as director of the Tyndall CentreDavid Biello, Science Curator at Ted Talks and former Scientific American Energy and Environment Editor, will moderate the session.

Kevin Anderson

Session 1 Panelists include: Jeffrey Sachs, world-renowned professor of economics, leader in sustainable development senior UN advisor, bestselling author, syndicated columnist and former Director of Columbia University’s Earth Institute and Kevin Anderson, Professor of Energy and Climate Change in the School of Mechanical, Aeronautical and Civil Engineering at the University of Manchester. Kevin recently finished a two-year position as director of the Tyndall Centre as well as  John Shepherd, Emeritus Professor of Earth System Science within the Ocean and Earth Science department of the Faculty of Natural and Environmental Science, University of Southampton, at the National Oceanography Centre Southampton and a Fellow of the Royal Society.

John Shepherd John Shepherd

 

David Biello David Biello
David Biello, Science Curator at Ted Talks and former Scientific American Energy and Environment Editor, will moderate the session.
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Integrating Environment and Health

by Arturo Herrera on October 29, 2016

Join the National Council on Science and the Environment and SSF in a 60 minute webinar  as we opened up on some of the issues that will be addressed in NCSE’s January 2017 Annual Conference in Washington D.C.

Several of the global leaders from the plenary sessions will bring their perspective to the webinar and preview conference topics including the brilliant Tim Jackson, Professor of Sustainable Development at the University of Surrey and Director of the newly-awarded Centre for the Understanding of Sustainable Prosperity (CUSP). and former Economics Commissioner on the UK Sustainable Development Commission.
A decade ago, the 7th NCSE Annual Conference addressed environmental and human health connections. Much has transpired since then, both in the scientific community and among regulatory agencies. A good deal of cutting-edge research has been undertaken (the results of which have been recently published) and several policy-related initiatives have been launched, all of which place greater emphasis on emerging issues and innovative solutions.
See the webinar below:

Integrating Environment and Health from Security & Sustainability Forum on Vimeo.

See the Slides here
NCSE 2017: Integrating Environment and Health will bring together diverse groups of individuals and experts – including researchers, educators, students, policy-makers, and entrepreneurs – to explore these relationships on specific issues and develop recommendations on actionable items.

Tim Jackson’s
Ted Talk on Prosperity – 
an economic reality check

PANELISTS

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Environmental Health Mission Area focuses on the interface between health and the environment, where interactions among people, the environment, and other living organisms affect the risk of toxicologic and infectious disease. The Mission characterizes the processes that affect the interaction among the physical environment, the living environment, and people, and the resulting factors that affect ecological and human exposure to disease agents.

Patti Bright, Senior Science Advisor to the USGS Environmental Health Mission Areas. Dr. Bright works for the US Geological Survey (USGS)-Environmental Health Mission Area as Senior Science Advisor.   USGS Environmental Health focuses on the interface between health and the environment to better understand how interactions among people, animals (wild and domesticated) and the environment affect the risk of exposure to environmental disease agents (both toxicological and infectious).   Dr. Bright also serves as the USGS  Chemical and Biological Threats Preparedness and Response Coordinator, coordinating activities to address emerging health threats.

The webinar will be moderated by NCSE’s Executive Executive, Michelle Wyman and include the brilliant Tim Jackson, Professor of Sustainable Development at the University of Surrey, Director of the newly-awarded Centre for the Understanding of Sustainable Prosperity (CUSP), and former Economics Commissioner on the UK Sustainable Development

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When We Think of Water in the West, We Think of Conflict and Crisis.

But communities have often shown more resilience.
In recent years, newspaper headlines have screamed, “Scarce water and the death of California farms,” “The Dust Bowl returns,” “A ‘megadrought’ will grip the U.S. in the coming decades.” Yet similar stories have been appearing for decades and the taps continue to flow.
John Fleck

John Fleck, Director of the University of New Mexico’s Water Resources Program, argues in his new book, Water is for Fighting Over and other myths about water in the west, that the talk of impending doom is not only untrue, but dangerous. When people get scared, they fight for the last drop of water; but when they actually have less, they use less.  Using the Colorado River as an example, Fleck brings to light the true history of collaboration and examines the bonds currently being forged to solve the Basin’s most dire threats. Rather than perpetuate the myth “Whiskey’s for drinkin’, water’s for fightin’ over,” Fleck urges us to embrace a new, more optimistic narrative-a future where the Colorado continues to flow.

 Join the Security and Sustainability Forum  and Island Press in an encouraging water management webinar featuring John Fleck.
Island Press
Sharon Medal
John will be joined by Sharon Megdal, Director of The University of Arizona’s Water Resources Research Center and C.W. and Modene Neely Endowed Professor.  She focuses on state, regional and transboundary water resources management and policy. Sharon has served on numerous state boards and commissions, including the Arizona Corporation Commission, the Arizona State Transportation Board, and the Blue Ribbon Panel on Water Sustainability.
Lucy Moore
Lucy Moore, mediator, facilitator, trainer and consultant, who specializes in natural resource and public policy disputes, will moderate the session.  The title of her book, Common Ground on Hostile Turf, concisely depicts what she does – guide diverse interests to common ground. 

 

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Healthy Cities in the Era of Climate Change

August 15, 2016

“Climate change is the biggest global health threat of the 21st century,” according to the Lancet Commission on Health and Climate Change. But here’s the good news.  The same Commission concluded that “Tackling climate change could be the greatest global health opportunity of the 21st century.” Indeed, many of the actions we must take to mitigate climate […]

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Webinar: Biting the Hands That Feed Us – September 27

August 10, 2016

Food waste, hunger, inhumane livestock conditions, disappearing fish stocks-these are exactly the kind of issues we expect food regulations to combat. Yet, today in the United States, laws exist at all levels of government that actually make these problems worse. SSF and  Island Press  had a webinar featuring Baylen Linnekin, author of Biting the Hands that Feed Us, […]

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The Transition to Renewable Energy – Not Business as Usual!

July 11, 2016

  The next few decades will see a profound energy transformation throughout the world. By the end of the century (and perhaps sooner), we will shift from fossil fuel dependence to rely primarily on renewable sources – solar, wind, biomass, and geothermal power. Driven by the need to avert catastrophic climate change and by the depletion of […]

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Webinar: Status of the Circular Economy

June 1, 2016

The Circular Economy is more than minimizing waste generation.  It is a “cradle to rarely reaching the grave” approach to the economy and human activity. Watch the First Webinar in the Circular Economy Series on “Food Waste”. CE concepts rest on comprehensive approaches to closing loops, thus transforming our linear extract-make-use-dispose economy and reducing human-kind’s […]

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WEBINAR: Integrated Land Use: What do individuals and societies need from landscapes

May 20, 2016

Balancing Food Production and Ecosystem Services The ongoing extensification of agriculture is leading to historically unprecedented tradeoffs between food production and other ecosystem services such as biodiversity, non-timber forest products, landscapes aesthetics, culture, and many others. These tradeoffs are global, and sustainability scientists examine the telecoupled effects of globalization on traditional land management and societies. […]

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