WEBINAR: Post COP 21 From Intent to Action

by Arturo Herrera on February 5, 2016

February 26, 2016 – 11:00 to 12:30 PM EST – Register at http://bit.ly/20eb1Kl
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Critical commitments emerged from the 21st Conference of Parties (COP 21) December 2015 meeting  in Paris where developed and developing nations were able to bridge their economic-based differences and forge a landmark global greenhouse gas mitigation agreement. The accord sets a course for an historic transformation of the world’s fossil fuel-driven economy within decades with the goal of keeping global temperature change below 2 degrees Celsius from preindustrial levels.
From Intent to Action 
The agreement is the easy part of the Paris Accord.  The hard part is maintaining the intent of the goals when the actions necessary are not binding.
Join the Security and Sustainability Forum and Arizona State University’s School of Sustainability in our first webinar on next steps after COP 21.  This session examines the policy, legal and social justice challenges in the transition from intent to action and how success can be gauged along the way.
Meet the Panel
 
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Modertor:  Robert Perciasepe is President of the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions, a leading, independent voice for practical policy and action to address the twin challenges of energy and climate change. Bob has been an environmental policy leader in and outside government for more than 30 years, most recently as Deputy Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Previously, he served as chief operating officer of the National Audubon Society, Secretary of the Environment for the state of Maryland and as a senior planning official for the city of Baltimore.


 

 

Presenters:
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Daniel M. Bodansky is a preeminent authority on global climate change whose teaching and research focus on international environmental law and public international law. He teaches courses in international law and sustainability and is a key player in Arizona State University’s College of Law’s new Program on Law and Sustainability.

 


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Dirk Forrister is President and CEO of the International Emissions Trading Association (IETA). Previously, he was Managing Director at Natsource LLC, the manager of one of the world’s largest carbon funds. Earlier in his career, Mr. Forrister served as Chairman of the White House Climate Change Task Force in the Clinton Administration. Prior to that, he was Assistant U.S. Secretary of Energy for Congressional, Public and Intergovernmental Affairs.

 

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Sonya Klinsky is an Arizona State University Senior Scientist investigating how climate change policy has been developed and perceived in both domestic and international arenas. This work focuses on the development of cap and trade mechanisms, ongoing debates about justice, and the role of economic modeling in policy decision-making.

 

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Global Governance in the Face of Non-Traditional Risk

by Arturo Herrera on January 13, 2016

Thu, Feb 18, 2016 12:30 PM – 2:00 PM EST

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World order rests on a nation-state system that is stabilized through a web of intergovernmental institutions. Climate risk, by presenting fundamental resource challenges to those nation states, will also place strains on intergovernmental institutions, and global governance in general. This webinar will explore how global governance will be affected by climate, as well as how the institutions of global governance can react to climate risk in a way that will strengthen resilience, and enhance cooperation in the international system.
This is the last webinar in the Global Climate Security series co-hosted by the Global Security Initiative at Arizona State University.  To view the previous webinar recordings in the series go to the SSF archives.  http://securityandsustainabilityforum.org/archives/webinars
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Moderator
 
 Dr. Nadya T. Bliss is the Director of GSI at Arizona State University and was the founding Group Leader of MIT’s Lincoln Laboratory’s Computing and Analytics Group. GSI serves as ASU’s university-wide hub focusing on addressing emerging global challenges characterized by complex interdependencies often presenting conflicting objectives, such as cyber security and digital identity, mitigation and adaptation to climate change impacts, and human security, all of which require multi-disciplinary research and cross-mission collaboration among the defense, development and diplomacy communities.
 
Panelists
 
Dr. Chad Briggs is a Principal Consultant with GlobalINT.  He has a PhD in political science from Carleton University in Canada, and specializes in translation of complex scientific data into risk assessments and strategic planning. He worked as Team Leader under the Energy and Environmental Security Directorate at the US Dept of Energy, and from 2008-2010 was Senior Advisor for International Security Affairs and Special Advisor on Climate Change and Strategic Assessment. He led the Abrupt Climate Change & Security team for DOE, which was tasked with developing methods to assess security risks of abrupt climate changes and communicating these to policymakers. Chad has also worked on post-conflict reconstruction and environmental health issues, including extensive fieldwork in Eastern and Southeastern Europe. After growing up on a farm in rural Wisconsin, he has studied in nine countries since he was first an exchange student to France in 1984.
Shiloh Fetzek is Senior Fellow for International Affairs at the Center for Climate and Security. She is also currently Senior Research Associate for Environment, Climate Change and Security at International Alert in London. She is a security analyst focusing on climate change and environment, based at international affairs and security think tanks since 2007. Her research areas at IISS included climate and demographic security, Syria and the Arctic. She previously led climate security research projects at the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS) and the Royal United Services Institute (RUSI) in London. Ms. Fetzek’s research interests include the social and political repercussions of rapid, large-scale ecological change and their interplay with other drivers of insecurity, including demographic dynamics. At International Alert, she contributes to the New Climate for Peace project commissioned by the G7 Foreign Ministers, along with other research and policy initiatives.
Taylor Dimsdale is Head of Research for E3G, which consults on climate diplomacy and energy policy. He works across several different programme areas including climate and resource security issues, energy policy related to the development of smart grids and demand side resources, international climate finance, and promoting transatlantic dialogue on climate change. Previously he was with the American Institutes for Research.
Benjamin Pohl works as a Senior Project Manager for adelphi, advising on climate and resource governance as well as their interfaces with foreign, security and development policy. His current work focuses in particular on transboundary watercourses and water diplomacy. He was the coordinator and lead author of an expert report on strengthening foreign policy for transboundary waters that was launched at the 2014 Stockholm World Water Week. Moreover, he has worked on (the politics of) specific basins as well as the risks for state fragility related to the impact of climate change on the water cycle. Before joining adelphi, Benjamin Pohl was a desk officer in the German Foreign Office, working on EU cooperation in security and defence policy. Subsequently, he worked at the universities of Leiden and Aberdeen, researching and teaching international relations and completing a PhD on EU foreign policy and the Union’s crisis management operations.
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Decision Making and Climate Security for Business

by Arturo Herrera on January 7, 2016

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SSF and Arizona State University’s Global Security Initiative had their fourth webinar in the five-part series on Global Climate Security. This webinar examined how business is valuing climate impacts. To view the earlier webinar videos, go to the Security and Sustainability Forum archives.
Independent of government planning and preparedness for resiliency, business has decisions to make in terms of infrastructure and supply chain dependability. The first is a local issue, but the second is a global one, especially for international companies. Concerns are likely different depending on location and the inputs to development of goods and services. The webinar focused on how business can incorporate climate risks assessments and resiliency into its planning and investments in its supply chain, workforce and infrastructure.

 Decision Making and Climate Security for Business from Security & Sustainability Forum. Click here for the GSI final slides

 
The Lineup
Moderator:  Clark Miller is a Senior Sustainability Scientist with the Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability Associate and Professor, School for the Future of Innovation in Society. His research focuses on science, technology & globalization, with a particular emphasis on the design and critical analysisof knowledge systems in support of international and global policy making. He is the co-editor of Changing the Atmosphere: Expert Knowledge and Environmental Governance (with Paul Edwards); Arizona’s Energy Future; and Nanotechnology, the Brain, and the Future.
Panelists:
 
Kate Gordon is Vice Chair of Climate and Sustainable Urbanization at the Paulson Institute, where she provides overall strategy and coordination for the Institute’s climate change, air quality, and sustainable urbanization programs both in the US and China. She is also a Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress and a regular contributor to the Wall Street Journal as one of the paper’s “Energy Experts.” Before joining the Paulson Institute, she was Senior Vice President for Climate and Energy at Next Generation, a non-partisan think tank based in San Francisco, where she worked on California policy development as well as large-scale national communications and research projects. While at Next Generation, she helped launch and lead the “Risky Business Project,” co-chaired by Michael Bloomberg, Henry Paulson, and Tom Steyer, and focused on the economic risks the U.S. faces from unmitigated climate change.
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Lindene Patton is an expert in international risk management and policy and predictive analytics, including risk identification, modeling and validation. She has been responsible for designing and executing operational risk management solutions, building corporate-community partnerships, managing cross-company projects, crafting strategic communication platforms, serving as a trusted information advisor, and fostering business process improvements. She has Testified in both the U.S. Senate and U.S. House of Representatives, had multiple appointments to the World Economic Forum (WEF) Global Agenda Councils; authored and contributed to multiple WEF reports and events and to the Geneva Association working groups. She is the former Chief Climate Product Officer for Zurich, led Hazard Product and Strategy for Corelogic and currently consults on business strategy and restructuring, insurance and risk management.

nancy colletonNancy Colleton is an international leader in environmental communication and information. As the president of the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) she leads numerous initiatives that promote better understanding of the changing planet. She collaborates with senior-level government and industry executives to increase the awareness, value and use of Earth observations and to emphasize the need for a comprehensive strategy to ensure that citizens, business, and government at all levels have the environmental intelligence needed for improved decision making. Through high-visibility meetings, networking, opinion pieces, government liaison, testimony and media appearances, Ms. Colleton has highlighted the need to leverage investment in Earth observations for a growing and diverse user community. Ms. Colleton leads the Alliance for Earth Observations and co-chairs the Environmental Information Services Working Group (EISWG) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Science Advisory Board.

LivingstonDavid Livingston is an associate in Carnegie’s Energy and Climate Program, where his research focuses on innovation, markets, and risk. Prior to joining Carnegie, David gained experience at the World Trade Organization in Geneva and at the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) in Vienna. He has consulted for a number of organizations on projects relating to climate change, green growth, and stranded assets. Livingston is also an adjunct lecturer at the University of Southern California, teaching a course on energy markets and policy at the University’s Washington, DC center. He was selected as a Future Energy Leader for the 2014-2017 term of the World Energy Council, and currently serves on the Council’s Task Force on Rules of Trade & Investment. Livingston is also a nonresident associate of Carnegie Europe in Brussels, and serves as a member of the Unconventional Hydrocarbons Network, an advisory committee to the European Commission. He is a member of the Royal Institute for International Affairs (Chatham House) and the International Association for Energy Economics. In addition, he serves on the advisory board of SXSW Eco and a number of social enterprises.

 

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Listen to our Free archived webinars

by Arturo Herrera on January 4, 2016

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wedding_party_crowd.jpgSuccess in Paris – Agreement to Transform the Global Economy
Critical commitments emerged from the 21st Conference of Parties (COP 21) meeting this month in Paris where developed and developing nations were able to bridge their economic-based differences and forge a landmark global green house gas mitigation agreement. The accord sets a course for an historic transformation of the world’s fossil fuel-driven economy within decades with the goal of keeping global temperature change below 2 degrees Celsius from preindustrial levels.
That transformation will require massive investment in adaptation measures to address the imminent global impacts of climate change such as sea level rise and droughts, and  the devastation from extreme weather events.  It requires intense investment in technology research and development to create new sources of cleaner fuels and to bring down the cost of existing ones, as well as research to measure and monitor environmental conditions to better understand the Earth’s natural systems.
Funding the Transformation
The good news is that wealthier counties have made commitments of billions of dollars annually and industry leaders have pledged additional investments to start to underwrite the transition.  Over time, these investments should bring down the cost of powering a greener global economy and, hopefully, improve the quality of human life across the globe while arresting global warming.
this oneFollow Climate Progress with SSF
The Security and Sustainability Forum (SSF), a public interest organization, convenes experts from across the globe in free webinars to address climate solutions.  Over the coming months we will be hosting webinars on the topics critical to the challenges of meeting the COP 21 accord goals.  Join our mailing list for free webinar alerts.
The SSF archives are packed with educational webinars about critical climate adaptation and mitigation topics such as urban resilience, the food – water – energy nexus, droughts and flooding, green infrastructure, and global climate security,  among others.
Access the arsenal of free climate education in the SSF archives. http://securityandsustainabilityforum.org/archives/webinars
Our recent series on the Future of Sustainable Transportation Fuels webinar series, hosted byArizona State University, is one example of the relevant education we provide on climatechange and green technologies.  Here are links to each of the four webinars in this series.
The Future of Sustainable Transportation Fuels Videos
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Integrating Urban Resilience Systems – The SETS Approach

November 10, 2015

  The concept of resilience has been evolving as a way to address the current and future challenges cities face from a changing climate. Social, ecological, and technological domains with different but intersecting perspectives underlie the concept of resilience. Understanding how to accommodate these perspectives is critical to maintaining or even re-envisioning urban environments that […]

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Urban Resilience in the Era of Climate Change

October 30, 2015

 In an era rocked by climate change and other large-scale disruptions, our cities must be resilient to survive and thrive. But what does that mean, exactly? What characteristics do resilient cities share, and what can be done to cultivate them? How does resilience differ from sustainability, and where do the concepts overlap? Is resilience determined by a city’s “hardware”—its […]

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Climate Security and the 4Ds of Foreign Policy

October 23, 2015

Disaster risk reduction, development, diplomacy and defense communities have increasingly identified climate as a risk – and not just in the long term. For example, in the U.S. Department of Defense’s 2014 Climate Change Adaptation Roadmap, the Pentagon states that climate risk “poses immediate risks to national security.” But beyond acknowledging the risks involved, what […]

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Tidal and Sea Level Rise Flooding – Actionable intelligence for local communities and the neighborhoods that they serve

October 9, 2015

This webinar focused on how to effectively communicate coastal climate risks to homeowners, businesses and governments in order to make them better prepared and more resilient to floods. The panel will address tidal and storm flood issues, as well as sea-level rise and the use of innovative data tools to predict and prepare for extreme […]

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How to Get Things Done in Cities: Bridging the Public-Private Divide

October 6, 2015

There has been a revolution in urban transportation over the past five years—set off by start-ups across the US and internationally. While large cities such as New York, Chicago, and Washington, D.C. have embraced these innovations, other cities often find it difficult to gather the political will, public support, and capital necessary to implement large-scale […]

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