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The race for business to take the lead for global sustainability efforts is on. What does business leadership on sustainability look like in a profit-driven industry? How can sustainability shift to be more friendly to the bottom line? And how can big business partner with government to achieve significant large-scale progress?

Join The Economist and 200 leaders from business, investment, politics, academia and civil society to identify the new business rules of sustainability. Conversations will offer strategies, ideas and solutions to help decision makers prepare for a sustainable future.


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HEAR FROM THE EXPERTS, INCLUDING:

Steve Adler

Mayor
Austin

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Cynthia Ringo

Senior partner
DBL Partners

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Trisa Thompson

Chief responsibility officer
Dell

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Webinar: Ending Energy Poverty

by Arturo Herrera on April 24, 2017

MAY 30 @ 11:30 AM – 1:00 PM ET at http://bit.ly/2pXBSmD

Global electrification reached 85.3% in 2014, however, over 1 billion people still do not have electricity and more than 2.7 billion people are without clean cooking facilities. What has worked in developing nations to increase access to modern energy services, how can affordable energy deployment be accelerated and how can the social, cultural, geopolitical and educational barriers be overcome?

Join SSF and Arizona State University in a 90 minute webinar with research and policy experts.

Clark Miller will moderate the session. Clark is Senior Sustainability Scientist in the Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability and Associate Professor, School for the Future of Innovation in Society at ASU. As part of the ASU LightWorks leadership team, he coordinates social science, humanities, and policy research on energy transitions, seeking to understand the social dynamics and societal implications of large-scale changes in energy systems.

Panelists include:

Clark Miller will moderate the session. Clark is a Senior Sustainability Scientist in the Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability and Associate Professor, School for the Future of Innovation in Society at ASU.  As part of the ASU LightWorks leadership team, he coordinates social science, humanities, and policy research on energy transitions, seeking to understand the social dynamics and societal implications of large-scale changes in energy systems.
Kartikeya Singh is deputy director of the Wadhwani Chair in U.S.-India Policy Studies at CSIS. His research interests include climate change and energy policy, innovation, and the geopolitics of energy use. His work has allowed him to field-test and deploy clean energy technologies, including electric vehicles and off-grid solar solutions in India and Uganda.
 Joy Clancy is a Professor in Development Studies specializing in Gender at the University of Twene. Her research has focused, for more than 30 years, on small scale energy systems for developing countries, including the technology transfer process and the role that energy plays as an input for small businesses and the potential it offers entrepreneurs, particularly women, through the provision of a new infrastructure service.
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http://bit.ly/2pjzhQQ  1:00 PM to 2:00 PM EDT  – April 28, 2017

Learn how climate change strategies can improve community design and transportation practices. Presenters will discuss approaches to support healthy, equitable communities. This is the third webinar supporting the American Public Health Association’s “Year of Climate Change and Health”. The panel and topic areas will be announced next week.

If you missed the first two webinars, you can watch them here. The webinar series will help to kick off the American Public Health Association’s “Year of Climate Change and Health“.

 

Moderator:
Kate Robb

Katherine Robb is a policy analyst working on the Healthy Community Design initiatives for APHA’s Center for Public Health Policy. This work includes active transportation, and healthy homes. Kate brings expertise in community engagement, chronic disease prevention initiatives, & promoting walkability on a local level.

 
Panelists:

Linda Rudolph

Linda Rudolph

Linda Rudolph, Director, Center for Climate Change & Health, Public Health Institute. Dr. Linda Rudolph is the Director of the Center for Climate Change and Health at the Public Health Institute. She formerly served as Deputy Director for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion at the California Department of Public Health, where she was the convening chair of the California Health in All Policies Task Force and the California Climate Action Team Public Health Work Group. Previously, Dr. Rudolph was the Public Health Director and Health Officer for the City of Berkeley.

Tia Taylor Williams, Deputy Director, Center for School, Health and Education

Tia Taylor Williams

and Center for Public Health Policy, APHA.  She has responsibility for leadership and administration of programmatic and policy strategies to achieve health equity. Tia has been at APHA for over eight years and has managed a portfolio of projects aimed at addressing the social determinants of health.

Scott Brown

Scott Brown, Research Assistant Professor, Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Environment & Public Health and the School of Architecture, University of Miami. Dr. Brown is a research assistant professor of public health sciences at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, with a secondary appointment in the University of Miami School of Architecture, and a member of the American Institute of Architects Design and Health Research Consortium. His research investigates impacts of the built environment (e.g., walkability, greenery) on health outcomes, including elders’ physical and mental functioning, immigrants’ cardiometabolic health, and children’s conduct problems. He is currently collaborating with the Miami-Dade Parks, Recreation and Open Spaces Department to improve access to parks and greenery.

If you missed the first two webinars, you can watch them here. 

Climate Justice Changes Health: Local, Tribal, Global, and Generational

 

 

 

Climate Changes Health: Clean Energy Changes Climate

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Closing the Environmental Literacy Gap

by Arturo Herrera on March 27, 2017

Experts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Wildlife Federation (NWF) joined The Nature Generation, a nonprofit aiming to inspire the next generation of environmental stewards, in a comprehensive discussion on our nation’s environmental literacy gap.

Panelists explored the extent of the gap; its relevant to our future including environmental implications as well as security, economic, and social significance; disparities within the gap itself; and effective ways to close it. This conversation included an extensive Q&A session allowing the audience to engage with the experts.

 The webinar covered a wide range of topics within environmental literacy and education and will be of interest to students and educators, policy makers and public officials, environmental and conservation organizations, and professionals working in the environment or energy sectors. 

The Nature Generation is the founder of the Green Earth Book Award, where authors who write meaningful literature around environmental priorities are celebrated; the 2017 honored authors will be announced during the conclusion of the webinar as a resource to attendees and to honor the authors commitment to environmental education. 

Meet the Panel:

Moderator: Amy Marasco Newton is the Founder and President of the Nature Generation. NatGen focuses on programs to inspire this next generation to carry forward the environmental mantle through outdoor programs, curriculum enrichment and recognition and awards programs.


Kevin J. Coyle, JD
, National Wildlife Federation, Vice President, Education and Training. Kevin  has committed thirty-five years to improving America’s education and environmental education fields.

Louisa Koch, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Director, Office of Education and Chair, NOAA Education Council.  In this role she leads programs to educate and inspire the public and future workforce about the Earth System, working with NOAA’s array of people, partners, places and information.

Jonathan JeffersonEdD, Administrator, Uniondale Public Schools, New York , is an innovator in environmental education.  He is also author of “Echos from the Farm”, taking from his experiences as a city boy spending summers on the family farm

Webinar Sponsors

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The man who popularized Greek-style yogurt, Hamdi Ulukaya, is probably one of the only, if not the only, billionaire of recent years who does not owe his fortune to the government. Jeff Bezos does, Bill Gates does, Mark Zuckerberg does, along with dozens of others who have amassed fortunes in the digital age.

They are smart men all who have exploited opportunities, which would not have existed but for the government’s presence in science. I applaud individuals who build on government discoveries to make their fortunes.

But government-backed science, which has brought us everything from GPS to the internet, is in for a radical reversal, as laid out in the Trump administration’s budget proposal.

It was greeted with derision when it was released, with many hoping Congress will reverse it. However in the science community, in the halls of the National Science Foundation, in the facilities of the National Institutes of Health, and in the sprawling world of the Department of Energy’s national laboratories, there is fear and alarm.

There should be. There should be from the world of learning a great bellow of rage, too.

The Trump administration has declared essentially that the United States cannot afford to be wise, cannot afford to invent, cannot afford to cure or to minister, and cannot afford to continue the rate of scientific evolution, which has made science of the post-World War II period so thrilling, benefiting countless people.

The administration has identified 62 programs for elimination or severe cutbacks. It has done this in a mixture of ignorance, indifference and delusion. The ignorance is that it does not seem to know how we got where we are; the indifference is part of a broad, anti-intellectual tilt on the political right; and the delusion is the hapless belief that science and engineering’s forward leap of 75 years will be carried on in the private sector.

The broad antipathy to science, to learning in all but the most general sense, is the mark of the Trump budget proposal.

But science, whether it is coming from ARPA-E, (Advanced Projects Research Research Agency-Energy) or the National Science Foundation’s watering of the tender shoots of invention, the Department of Energy’s world-leading contribution to the Human Genome Project, or the National Institutes of Health’s endless war against disease (especially the small and awful diseases like Myalgic Encephalomyelitis and the rarest cancers) is the future. Without it, the nation is gobbling its seed corn.

In the Trump administration, there is money to build a giant wall but no money to surge forward into the future.

To the administration, as indicated in its budget proposal, the sciences and the engineering that flows from them is a luxury. It is not. It is the raw materials of peace and strength in this century and beyond.

To take just one of the follies implicit in the philistine budget, cutting funding for medical research will come just when there is need for more — research that if not funded by the government will not be done. New epidemics like bird flu, Zika and Ebola cry out for research.

Increasingly, the old paradigm that new drugs would come from the drug companies is broken. It now costs a drug company close to $2 billion to bring a new compound to market. That cost is reflected in new drug prices, as the companies struggle to recoup their investments before their drugs go off patent. Shareholder value does not encourage the taking of chances, but rather the buying up of the competition. And that is happening in the industry.

The world desperately needs a new generation of antibiotics. The drug companies are not developing them, and the bugs are mutating happily, developing resistance to the drugs that have held bacterial disease at bay since penicillin led the way 89 years ago.

Fighting the political folly that threatens science is the battle for America. In 50 years, without amply government-funded research and development, will we still be the incubator for invention, the shock troops against disease, the progenitors of a time of global abundance?

Our place in the world is not determined by our ideology, but by our invention. Sadly, the pace of invention is at stake, attacked by a particularly virulent and aberrant strain of governmental thinking.­­

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Restoring the Carbon Balance- Session 3: Policies and Financing

March 22, 2017

Thu, May 11, 2017 1:00 PM – 2:30 PM EDT – REGISTER AT http://bit.ly/2mUwNXJ   The webinar series, Restoring the Carbon Balance, SSF is producing with LightWorks at Arizona State University, is about taking research steps now to have technologies commercially available in the next decade or so, which can cost-effectively extract residual carbon from the air. According […]

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RELEASE: U.S. Military Leaders Applaud Secretary Mattis’ Clear-Eyed View on Climate Change and Security

March 17, 2017

by Caitlin Werrell and Francesco Femia    RELEASE: U.S. Military Leaders Applaud Secretary Mattis’ Clear-Eyed View on Climate Change and SecurityWashington, D.C., March 16, 2017 — The Center for Climate and Security (CCS), a policy institute with an Advisory Board of retired senior military officers and national security experts, applauds Secretary of Defense James Mattis’ clear-eyed view on the national security risks of […]

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Biophillic Cities, Integrating Nature into Urban Design and Planning

March 7, 2017

May 9, 2017 at 1:15 PM to 2:45 PM REGISTER AT http://bit.ly/2nbp72T The “greening” of cities can focus on everything except nature, emphasizing such elements as public transit, renewable energy production, and energy efficient building systems. While these are important aspects of reimagining urban living, human beings have an innate need to connect with the natural world […]

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TEST VIDEO PAGE

March 1, 2017

The Security and Sustainability Forum has produced webinars on food and water security, public health, economic vitality and infrastructure. Click here to access the webinar archives. Click on the session name for webinar details and access to the video and slide presentation.   Moderator Ann Goodman explored the implications of climate risk for business. Experts from among the companies […]

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Climate Justice Changes Health: Local, Tribal, Global, and Generational

February 15, 2017

 This year, 2017, is the American Public Health Association’s “Year of Climate Change and Health”. Please join APHA, Center for Climate Change and Health, Island Pressand the Security and Sustainability Forum for a very special kick-off webinar on Climate Justice Changes Health: Local, Tribal, Global, and Generational. The webinar panelists are engaged in the fight for climate justice and healthy communities. They […]

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