Wed, Jul 26, 2017 1:15 PM – 2:45 PM EDT – http://bit.ly/2rUQF3z

Until now, there has been only one source of data on global fishery catches: information reported to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations by member countries. An extensive, ten-year study conducted by The Sea Around Us Project of the University of British Columbia shows that this catch data is fundamentally misleading. Many countries under report the amount of fish caught (some by as much as 500%), while others such as China significantly over report their catches.

 
The Global Atlas of Marine Fisheries is the first and only book to provide accurate, country-by-country fishery data. This groundbreaking information has been gathered from independent sources by the world’s foremost fisheries experts, and edited by Daniel Pauly and Dirk Zeller of the Sea Around Us Project.
Meet the Panel
 
Daniel Pauly

Daniel Pauly is a professor at the Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries (formerly Fisheries Centre) at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver. He is also Principal Investigator for the Sea Around Us, a scientific collaboration funded mainly by The Pew Charitable Trusts and by the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation.

 
Dirk Zeller

Dirk Zeller is the Senior Research Scientist and Executive Director of the Sea Around Us. He has produced over 300 scientific contributions in journals, book chapters, and research reports.

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Webinar: Cities on the Leading Edge of Resilience

by Arturo Herrera on June 14, 2017

July 13, 2017 – 1:15 to 2:45 PM EST  REGISTER at http://bit.ly/2rr8kj5
The private sector and all levels of government are embracing resilience as a holistic, proactive framework to reduce risk, improve services, adapt to changing conditions, and empower citizens. Recent high profile programs, such as the $1 billion National Disaster Resilience Competition initiated by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development and the Rockefeller Foundation’s 100 Resilient Communities, have helped define and advance this resilience framework for local government.
In 2016, the National League of Cities (NLC) launched a Leadership in Community Resilience program to help elected officials, city staff, and community partners share their experiences and advance local resilience efforts. The pilot initiative is providing technical assistance and professional development opportunities for 10 cities by supporting local resilience initiatives that have been prioritized by each city. This webinar, hosted by Arizona State University and NLC, will spotlight several cities and share their process for planning, building engagement, and implementing resilience initiatives with limited resources.

PANEL

Lauren Withycombe Keeler will moderate the webinar.  Dr. Keeler is a visiting assistant professor in the School for the Future of Innovation in Society at Arizona State University and founding member of the Center for the Study of the Future and the Risk Innovation Lab. She is trained in sustainability science and in her research and teaching she explores the future impacts of social and technological innovation on sustainability goals.  She has worked in the United States and Germany with universities, businesses, and governments utilizing participatory scenario construction, visioning and sustainability assessment to explore issues of sustainability and responsible innovation with a focus on cities, water systems, and human health and well-being.
At the National League of Cities, Shafaq Choudry oversees the Leadership in Community Resilience program where she provides technical assistance to local officials, city staff and community partners across 10 cities. The program is shaped to support and elevate cities economic, environmental, and social resiliency initiatives as they prepare, adapt and respond to climate change.
Shafaq Choudry
Braden Kay is the Sustainability Manager for the City of Tempe and a Senior Sustainability Fellow in ASU’s Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability. Dr. Kay was recently the Sustainability Project Manager for the City of Orlando, where he led sustainability implementation in waste diversion, urban forestry, and urban agriculture programs.
Braden Kay
Cooper Martin is the Program Director for the Sustainable Cities Institute at the National League of Cities. The SCI program provides information, tools, and guidance to strengthen communities and enable them to thrive while facing the challenges presented by a changing climate and uncertain global economy. His areas of expertise include climate resilience, community development, transportation, environmental economics, and emergency management.
Cooper Martin

 

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Steven Cohen, Contributor Executive Director, Columbia University’s Earth Institute  — Last week I anticipated President Trump’s shortsighted decision to withdraw from the Paris climate accord and predicted that his actions might provide environmentalists with a common enemy to rally against. That seems to be happening. Former NYC mayor Michael Bloomberg is organizing American corporations, states, cities and other institutions to commit to greenhouse gas reductions and be recognized by the U.N. as they fulfill the U.S. reduction obligations under Paris. Now all we need is a few billion dollars for renewable energy in the developing world and Trump’s Rose Garden rant last week becomes truly meaningless. Bloomberg’s leadership and the rapid mobilization of leaders concerned about climate change demonstrates that America’s power resides both inside and outside the Washington beltway.

Withdrawing from the Paris Agreement was the most straightforward part of Trump’s rhetoric last week. The truly convoluted part of his talk was his misread of the economic impact of environmental regulation and his ideas about how America’s economy will be revitalized. It is true that some of our trade deals and regulations could be better, but the world has a global economy and America has the strongest economy in the world. The rules and our trade agreements can’t be that bad if we seem to be winning. This horrible, depressed, crime-ridden America the president presented in his inaugural address and again in the Rose Garden may be the view he sees from Trump Tower, but it’s not the reality a majority of Americans experience. Still, enough people are suffering that it makes political sense for him to try to serve as their voice. I get his motivation. But the part that really makes no sense is his idea that a vast increase in the fossil fuel business will generate an American economic boom. It won’t.

The economic future does not belong to resource extraction industries. Communities that host these businesses know what I mean. The resource extractors come, they dig, drill, pump and spread money around but also strain local services and infrastructure. Eventually they leave, and the local folks get to clean up the mess. There’s always a good economic reason that extraction comes to an end. The price of the resource might drop, the resource becomes harder and more expensive to get to, or cheaper alternatives are discovered. For the coal business, it’s been fracking and natural gas that caused them pain. For coal workers, it was mountain top removal and other mechanized forms of extraction that reduced the employment in mining. It is unbelievably deceptive of the President of the United States to articulate an economic strategy that calls for the revival of these businesses. The coal miners know that they need to prepare for a different type of work. They certainly know their children need to be prepared for change.

The nature of economic life is changing and it is very important that we look forward instead of backward. The U.S. energy sector added 300,000 jobs in 2016: most were in energy efficiency and renewable energy. According to the Department of Energy’s U.S. Energy Employment Report:

“Electric Power Generation and Fuels technologies directly employ more than 1.9 million workers. In 2016, 55 percent, or 1.1 million, of these employees worked in traditional coal, oil, and gas, while almost 800,000 workers were employed in low carbon emission generation technologies, including renewables, nuclear, and advanced/low emission natural gas. Just under 374,000 individuals work, in whole or in part, for solar firms, with more than 260,000 of those employees spending the majority of their time on solar. There are an additional 102,000 workers employed at wind firms across the nation. The solar workforce increased by 25% in 2016, while wind employment increased by 32%.”

The report also notes that “2.2 million Americans are employed, in whole or in part, in the design, installation, and manufacture of Energy Efficiency products and services, adding 133,000 jobs in 2016.” Modernizing our energy system to make it more efficient and less polluting is a growing business. Coal mining is a shrinking business. President Trump is doubling down on a loser.

As an educator, I am biased, but I believe that the economic future requires us to attract, educate and employ the world’s best minds. That requires intelligent and encouraging immigration policy, improved public schools, great universities, and great quality of life in the cities that house America’s researchers and businesses. Great quality of life means clean air, clean water, health care, safe cities, stimulating and exciting cities, along with preserved and beautiful natural spaces. Walking away from a global climate treaty, discouraging immigration, and cutting spending on science and education make it more difficult for our communities and for our nation to be competitive in the brain based economy.

Fortunately, many of Trump’s plans are being countered by other parts of our government, other institutions, and his own inability to form a competent government. Congress seems to be restoring some of his science budget cuts, the courts are countering his immigration policy excesses, and nearly everyone is trying to reduce their greenhouse gases. President Trump’s visible attack on the climate treaty is disheartening, but it is far from the last word on the subject. Paris, after all, does not mandate greenhouse gas reductions, it sets voluntary targets; America’s own Clean Air Act mandates reductions in greenhouse gases. This was decided in a Supreme Court decision handed down in 2007 when George W. Bush was president. The Court was responding to a lawsuit brought by a group of state attorneys general. The U.S. Supreme Court determined at that time that greenhouse gases were dangerous air pollutants. EPA was directed to develop regulations to reduce that pollution and Trump and his EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt are required to issue and enforce that regulation. Trump can withdraw from Paris, but he is sworn to uphold the U.S. Constitution.

The U.S. must act, but what about the rest of the world? Climate change is a global problem that requires global solutions. Nearly every government in the world understands that and we have seen no retreat from the climate treaty since the president’s announcement. In fact, we have seen a broad and uniform recommitment to the goals of mitigating climate change. President Trump took a symbolic act to achieve a political objective. He kept his campaign promise, largely because he and his team do not understand the climate issue or the economic opportunity presented by the transition to a renewable resource based economy. While we still do not know the long-term impact of his action, the short term impact has been to mobilize a broad segment of the U.S. and global public in support of the agreement. The Paris agreement remains intact, despite Trump’s reckless action. As Bogart told Bergman at the Casablanca airport: “We’ll always have Paris.” Of course, he meant the memory of what might have been. Let’s hope we do better with the planet than Bogey seemed to do with the Nazis or his love life in the movie Casablanca. I suspect we will.

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Solar Hot Water Systems – What you Need to Know

by Arturo Herrera on June 2, 2017

 http://bit.ly/2qKboq9 – Wed, Jun 28, 2017 1:15 PM – 2:15 PM EDT –Going Green without Going into the Red SSF’s Green Technology Webinar Series – Register for the first webinar

SSF is starting a new webinar series to feature green energy and environmentally friendly technologies with big potential benefits. The purpose of Going Green Without Going Into the Red is to learn about green technology applications and provide developers an opportunity to feature their innovations. The first webinar in this series is on June 28th and we will book others as we find impactful technologies to review.  The format will be

  • a presentation by a technical expert about the technology area
  • a short product presentation by developer
  • questioning by the expert
  • audience Q&A.

Initially we are focusing on building performance because Scott Sklar, a noted clean energy technology leader has agreed to be the expert to kick off the series. Scott was the Executive Director of the Solar

Rayviance Installed

Energy Industries Association, so we are starting with a solar application and focusing on hot water heating. Water heating systems are the second biggest user of electricity in the home, accounting for an average of 18 percent of electricity costs, according to the U.S. Department of Energy. So the impact of solar alternatives is significant.

Solar energy can be used in several ways to heat water for domestic, commercial and industrial uses. Examples include photo voltaic cells to generate electricity for hot water heaters and both passive and active thermal solar systems for direct heat. With the cost of solar equipment dropping, there are significant savings in solar hot water, but what are the considerations in determining which technology is best for your situation?

In this 60-minute webinar, Scott Sklar will review the pros and cons of investing in a solar hot water system (residential, commercial and industrial uses) and what to consider in making the investment decision. We will also hear from Arden Steiner, co-founder of Rayviance. The firm has added innovations to its license for a solar hot water technology based on a pump free thermosyphon convection flow system. Arden has installed the system in a number of commercial and residential sites and will present them as case studies in the webinar. He will explain why Rayviance has significant operational and cost advantages over the alternatives. Scott will question Arden about the technology and it’s advantages.

Meet the Panel

Scott Sklar is President of The Stella Group, Ltd. a strategic policy and clean technology optimization firm facilitating clean distributed energy utilization which includes advanced batteries and controls, energy efficiency, fuel cells, geoexchange, heat engines, minigeneration (propane/natural gas), microhydropower (and freeflow, tidal, wave), modular biomass, photovoltaics, small wind, and solar thermal (including daylighting, water heating, industrial preheat, building air-conditioning, and electric power generation). Previously, Scott Sklar served for 15 years simultaneously running two Washington, DC-based trade associations, as Executive Director of both the Solar Energy Industries Association and the National BioEnergy Industries Association.

Arden Steiner is a business owner in the energy industry. He is the general manager of Affordable Fuels, a full service energy marketer in Middleburg, Pa. Arden is also one of the founders of Rayviance, which has the US license for the solar hot water system. The technology was originally developed by the U.S. Agency for International Development for a project in Nepal. Arden and his team subsequently added a number of improvements to enhance the system’s operational efficiency and durability. Arden will provide case studies by describing specific installations.
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What will it take to produce a workforce that understands the relationships between environmental, social, and business factors so we can better address the risks of climate change in the coming years? A number of interrelating systems comprise each factor so incorporating systems thinking into the public and private educational systems should result in graduates better prepared to understand the interrelationships and make or contribute to better climate decisions and policies. In this 90 minute webinar leaders from education, business and philanthropy discussed:

  1. The validity of the climate literacy gap and its impact on the workforce.
  2. Existing and emerging ways to teach systems thinking about climate disruptions, mitigation, adaptation and risk management.
  3. Concepts for developing the national/international capacity to support climate literacy .
  4. The role of philanthropy in accelerating deployment
  5. How community colleges can be at the center of better preparing the workforce for climate risk decisions.

Teaching Systems Thinking to Fill the Climate Literacy Gap from Security & Sustainability Forum on Vimeo.

Meet the Panel

Monica Brett, an international climate advisor and Senior Associate of the Security and Sustainability Forum, will moderate the session. She is a vocal advocate for using systems thinking to teach climate and energy literacy as the best way to show the connections between the three pillars of sustainable development and the consequences of action and/or inaction. She has applied this concept both internationally and in the field via curriculum design, educational programs and public outreach campaigns.
Bernie Kotlier directs the development, promotion, and delivery of sustainable energy training for the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) electricians, and business development programs for the National Electrical Contractor Association (NECA) electrical contractors in California and Nevada including energy auditing, energy efficiency, photovoltaics, zero net energy buildings, electric vehicles, energy storage, and micro-grids. He has been a member of the California Public Utilities Commission Advisory Committee on Energy Efficiency Workforce Development and the State of California Schools of the Future Initiative Advisory Committee. He now serves as co-chair of the California Advanced Lighting Controls Training Program and national co-chair of the Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program.

Christopher Boone is Dean of the School of Sustainability, Arizona State University. His research contributes to ongoing debates in sustainable urbanization, environmental justice, vulnerability, and global environmental change. He sits on the scientific steering committee for the Urbanization and Global Environmental Change project and is an active contributor to Future Earth, an international initiative that aims to integrate the global environmental change community with a focus on sustainable outcomes.


Chip Comins is Chairman & CEO of the American Renewable Energy Institute, President of American Spirit Productions and Founder of American Renewable Energy Day (AREDAY). As a strong advocate for employing renewable energy to mitigate climate change, he uses his documentaries, institute and global summit to both educate and provide platforms for solutions. Currently, his American Climate and Energy Literacy Initiative connects industry and community colleges to create jobs in clean technology sectors.

Leslie Mintz Tamminen is a Director of Seventh Generation Advisors. She worked to pass and implement California’s Education and the Environment Initiative, a state requirement for environmental education principles and curricula development in all core disciplines in public schools for K-12. Leslie is currently appointed to the California Superintendent of Public Instruction Environmental Literacy Steering Committee and tasked with implementing the 2015 Blueprint for California Environmental Literacy.
Jeanette Murry is Senior Knowledge & Learning Coordinator, Climate Change Strategy and Operations, at the World Bank. She has implemented knowledge management efforts and planning in international development, university, private sector and NGO contexts. She has extensive experience in learning design, development, delivery, and monitoring and evaluation with a focus on climate change.

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Webinar: How Sustainable is Our Global Climate Ethos

May 3, 2017

Building on decades of work across the globe by the public and private sectors, has a shared global climate ethos —  a sense of collective commitment and common purpose — reached a  tipping point? Are the Paris Agreement and the growing number of cities adopting carbon-based energy goals evidence of that? How durable are these […]

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June 7th – Join us for the Economist Events’ Sustainability Summit in Austin

April 27, 2017

REGISTER AND SAVE 15% WITH CODE SSF15 The race for business to take the lead for global sustainability efforts is on. What does business leadership on sustainability look like in a profit-driven industry? How can sustainability shift to be more friendly to the bottom line? And how can big business partner with government to achieve […]

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Webinar: Ending Energy Poverty

April 24, 2017

Global electrification reached 85.3% in 2014, however, over 1 billion people still do not have electricity and more than 2.7 billion people are without clean cooking facilities. What has worked in developing nations to increase access to modern energy services, how can affordable energy deployment be accelerated and how can the social, cultural, geopolitical and […]

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Climate Changes Health: Community Design and Transportation

April 14, 2017

Learn how climate change strategies can improve community design and transportation practices. Presenters discussed approaches to support healthy, equitable communities. This is the third webinar supporting the American Public Health Association’s “Year of Climate Change and Health”. Climate Changes Health_ Community Design and Transportation from Security & Sustainability Forum on Vimeo. If you missed the […]

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Closing the Environmental Literacy Gap

March 27, 2017

Experts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Wildlife Federation (NWF) joined The Nature Generation, a nonprofit aiming to inspire the next generation of environmental stewards, in a comprehensive discussion on our nation’s environmental literacy gap. Panelists explored the extent of the gap; its relevant to our future including environmental implications as well […]

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