Thu, Jun 1, 2017 1:15 PM – 2:45 PM EDT – REGISTER AT http://bit.ly/2r9ozxe

What will it take to produce a workforce that understands the relationships between environmental, social, and business factors so we can better address the risks of climate change in the coming years? A number of interrelating systems comprise each factor so incorporating systems thinking into the public and private educational systems should result in graduates better prepared to understand the interrelationships and make or contribute to better climate decisions and policies. In this 90 minute webinar join leaders from education, business and philanthropy as they discuss

  1. The validity of the climate literacy gap and its impact on the workforce.
  2. Existing and emerging ways to teach systems thinking about climate disruptions, mitigation, adaptation and risk management.
  3. Concepts for developing the national/international capacity to support climate literacy .
  4. The role of philanthropy in accelerating deployment
  5. How community colleges can be at the center of better preparing the workforce for climate risk decisions.

Meet the Panel

Monica Brett, an international climate advisor and Senior Associate of the Security and Sustainability Forum, will moderate the session. She is a vocal advocate for using systems thinking to teach climate and energy literacy as the best way to show the connections between the three pillars of sustainable development and the consequences of action and/or inaction. She has applied this concept both internationally and in the field via curriculum design, educational programs and public outreach campaigns.
Bernie Kotlier directs the development, promotion, and delivery of sustainable energy training for the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) electricians, and business development programs for the National Electrical Contractor Association (NECA) electrical contractors in California and Nevada including energy auditing, energy efficiency, photovoltaics, zero net energy buildings, electric vehicles, energy storage, and micro-grids. He has been a member of the California Public Utilities Commission Advisory Committee on Energy Efficiency Workforce Development and the State of California Schools of the Future Initiative Advisory Committee. He now serves as co-chair of the California Advanced Lighting Controls Training Program and national co-chair of the Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program.

Christopher Boone is Dean of the School of Sustainability, Arizona State University. His research contributes to ongoing debates in sustainable urbanization, environmental justice, vulnerability, and global environmental change. He sits on the scientific steering committee for the Urbanization and Global Environmental Change project and is an active contributor to Future Earth, an international initiative that aims to integrate the global environmental change community with a focus on sustainable outcomes.


Chip Comins is Chairman & CEO of the American Renewable Energy Institute, President of American Spirit Productions and Founder of American Renewable Energy Day (AREDAY). As a strong advocate for employing renewable energy to mitigate climate change, he uses his documentaries, institute and global summit to both educate and provide platforms for solutions. Currently, his American Climate and Energy Literacy Initiative connects industry and community colleges to create jobs in clean technology sectors.

Leslie Mintz Tamminen is a Director of Seventh Generation Advisors. She worked to pass and implement California’s Education and the Environment Initiative, a state requirement for environmental education principles and curricula development in all core disciplines in public schools for K-12. Leslie is currently appointed to the California Superintendent of Public Instruction Environmental Literacy Steering Committee and tasked with implementing the 2015 Blueprint for California Environmental Literacy.
Jeanette Murry is Senior Knowledge & Learning Coordinator, Climate Change Strategy and Operations, at the World Bank. She has implemented knowledge management efforts and planning in international development, university, private sector and NGO contexts. She has extensive experience in learning design, development, delivery, and monitoring and evaluation with a focus on climate change.

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Webinar: How Sustainable is Our Global Climate Ethos

by Arturo Herrera on May 3, 2017

How Sustainable is Our Global Climate Ethos and will it create a sustainable climate?
http://bit.ly/2qz2AQ9 June 8, 2017 at 1:15 to 2:45 PM EST
Building on decades of work across the globe by the public and private sectors, has a shared global climate ethos —  a sense of collective commitment and common purpose — reached a  tipping point?
  • Are the Paris Agreement and the growing number of cities adopting carbon-based energy goals evidence of that? How durable are these actions? 
  • Is a sense of common purpose sustainable without US federal government coordination and leadership? What roles do sub-national and municipal governments play?
  • How can business, security, religious, and civil society actors continue and even accelerate efforts to reduce emissions? Can they work together to avoid the worst climate impacts? 
  • Is the global commitment to climate solutions shallow or deep? 
  • How can moral, scientific and political imperatives find common ground?
  • Does the global climate ethos include extracting, storing and reusing carbon already in the atmosphere?
  • Where do opportunities for collaborative innovation exist?

Join Arizona State University and global governance, business, science, policy and faith leaders in a 90 minute webinar to explore the depth and breadth of a global climate ethos and the direction of plausible, innovative climate action emerging across sectors and among global societies.

This webinar will convene leaders in a public conversation that touches on these critical questions and that can inspire local conversations and ideas to advance cross-sectoral collaborations. We’ll also share resources to support a climate ethos dialogue in your community.

Panelists:

Katharine Hayhoe is a professor in the Department of Political Science and Director of the Climate Science Center at Texas Tech University, part of the Department of Interior’s South-Central Climate Science Center and founder and CEO of ATMOS Research. Katharine’s research focuses on establishing a scientific basis for assessing the regional to local-scale impacts of climate change on human systems and the natural environment.

 

Alice C. Hill is a Research Fellow at the Hoover Institution where her work focuses on building resilience to destabilizing catastrophic events, including the impacts of climate change. Prior to joining Hoover, she served as Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Resilience Policy for the National Security Council. While at the White House, Alice led the development of national policy regarding national security and climate change, incorporation of climate resilience considerations into international development, Federal efforts in the Arctic, building national capabilities for long-term drought resilience, and establishment of national risk management standards for three of the most damaging natural hazards

This webinar seeks to inspire local conversations and ideas to advance cross-sectoral collaborations.
We’ll also share resources to support a climate ethos dialogue in your community.

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REGISTER AND SAVE 15% WITH CODE SSF15

The race for business to take the lead for global sustainability efforts is on. What does business leadership on sustainability look like in a profit-driven industry? How can sustainability shift to be more friendly to the bottom line? And how can big business partner with government to achieve significant large-scale progress?

Join The Economist and 200 leaders from business, investment, politics, academia and civil society to identify the new business rules of sustainability. Conversations will offer strategies, ideas and solutions to help decision makers prepare for a sustainable future.


Download the programme
for full event details Register now and save 15% with code SSF15

HEAR FROM THE EXPERTS, INCLUDING:

Steve Adler

Mayor
Austin

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Cynthia Ringo

Senior partner
DBL Partners

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Trisa Thompson

Chief responsibility officer
Dell

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Webinar: Ending Energy Poverty

by Arturo Herrera on April 24, 2017

MAY 30 @ 11:30 AM – 1:00 PM ET at http://bit.ly/2pXBSmD

Global electrification reached 85.3% in 2014, however, over 1 billion people still do not have electricity and more than 2.7 billion people are without clean cooking facilities. What has worked in developing nations to increase access to modern energy services, how can affordable energy deployment be accelerated and how can the social, cultural, geopolitical and educational barriers be overcome?

Join SSF and Arizona State University in a 90 minute webinar with research and policy experts.

Clark Miller will moderate the session. Clark is Senior Sustainability Scientist in the Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability and Associate Professor, School for the Future of Innovation in Society at ASU. As part of the ASU LightWorks leadership team, he coordinates social science, humanities, and policy research on energy transitions, seeking to understand the social dynamics and societal implications of large-scale changes in energy systems.

Panelists include:

Clark Miller will moderate the session. Clark is a Senior Sustainability Scientist in the Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability and Associate Professor, School for the Future of Innovation in Society at ASU.  As part of the ASU LightWorks leadership team, he coordinates social science, humanities, and policy research on energy transitions, seeking to understand the social dynamics and societal implications of large-scale changes in energy systems.
Kartikeya Singh is deputy director of the Wadhwani Chair in U.S.-India Policy Studies at CSIS. His research interests include climate change and energy policy, innovation, and the geopolitics of energy use. His work has allowed him to field-test and deploy clean energy technologies, including electric vehicles and off-grid solar solutions in India and Uganda.
Joy Clancy is a Professor in Development Studies specializing in Gender at the University of Twene. Her research has focused, for more than 30 years, on small scale energy systems for developing countries, including the technology transfer process and the role that energy plays as an input for small businesses and the potential it offers entrepreneurs, particularly women, through the provision of a new infrastructure service.

Alon Abramson is the Program Manager at the Philadelphia Energy Authority where he

Alon Abranson

oversees the Energy Campaign, a 10-year, $1 billion program to make energy cleaner and more affordable for low income households, small businesses, municipal buildings, and schools in Philadelphia. Alon brings a background in best practices and policy for implementing energy efficiency programs in urban communities from his work at the Penn Institute for Urban Research at the University of Pennsylvania.

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Learn how climate change strategies can improve community design and transportation practices. Presenters discussed approaches to support healthy, equitable communities. This is the third webinar supporting the American Public Health Association’s “Year of Climate Change and Health”.

If you missed the first two webinars, you can watch them here. The webinar series will help to kick off the American Public Health Association’s “Year of Climate Change and Health“.

 

Moderator:
Kate Robb is a policy analyst working on the Healthy Community Design initiatives for APHA’s Center for Public Health Policy. This work includes active transportation, and healthy homes. Kate brings expertise in community engagement, chronic disease prevention initiatives, & promoting walkability on a local level.

 

 
Panelists:

Linda Rudolph

Linda Rudolph, Director, Center for Climate Change & Health, Public Health Institute. Dr. Linda Rudolph is the Director of the Center for Climate Change and Health at the Public Health Institute. She formerly served as Deputy Director for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion at the California Department of Public Health, where she was the convening chair of the California Health in All Policies Task Force and the California Climate Action Team Public Health Work Group. Previously, Dr. Rudolph was the Public Health Director and Health Officer for the City of Berkeley.

 

Tia Taylor Williams Deputy Director, Center for School, Health and Education and Center for Public Health Policy, APHA.  She has responsibility for leadership and administration of programmatic and policy strategies to achieve health equity. Tia has been at APHA for over eight years and has managed a portfolio of projects aimed at addressing the social determinants of health.

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Scott Brown, Research Assistant Professor, Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Environment & Public Health and the School of Architecture, University of Miami. Dr. Brown is a research assistant professor of public health sciences at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, with a secondary appointment in the University of Miami School of Architecture, and a member of the American Institute of Architects Design and Health Research Consortium. His research investigates impacts of the built environment (e.g., walkability, greenery) on health outcomes, including elders’ physical and mental functioning, immigrants’ cardiometabolic health, and children’s conduct problems. He is currently collaborating with the Miami-Dade Parks, Recreation and Open Spaces Department to improve access to parks and greenery.

 

If you missed the first two webinars, you can watch them here. 

Climate Justice Changes Health: Local, Tribal, Global, and Generational

 

 

 

Climate Changes Health: Clean Energy Changes Climate

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Closing the Environmental Literacy Gap

March 27, 2017

Experts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Wildlife Federation (NWF) joined The Nature Generation, a nonprofit aiming to inspire the next generation of environmental stewards, in a comprehensive discussion on our nation’s environmental literacy gap. Panelists explored the extent of the gap; its relevant to our future including environmental implications as well […]

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The Battle for America Is the Battle for Science By Llewellyn King

March 25, 2017

The man who popularized Greek-style yogurt, Hamdi Ulukaya, is probably one of the only, if not the only, billionaire of recent years who does not owe his fortune to the government. Jeff Bezos does, Bill Gates does, Mark Zuckerberg does, along with dozens of others who have amassed fortunes in the digital age. They are […]

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Restoring the Carbon Balance- Session 3: Policies and Financing

March 22, 2017

The webinar series, Restoring the Carbon Balance, SSF is producing with LightWorks at Arizona State University, is about taking research steps now to have technologies commercially available in the next decade or so, which can cost-effectively extract residual carbon from the air. According to the International Panel on Climate Change, that is what it will […]

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RELEASE: U.S. Military Leaders Applaud Secretary Mattis’ Clear-Eyed View on Climate Change and Security

March 17, 2017

by Caitlin Werrell and Francesco Femia    RELEASE: U.S. Military Leaders Applaud Secretary Mattis’ Clear-Eyed View on Climate Change and SecurityWashington, D.C., March 16, 2017 — The Center for Climate and Security (CCS), a policy institute with an Advisory Board of retired senior military officers and national security experts, applauds Secretary of Defense James Mattis’ clear-eyed view on the national security risks of […]

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Biophillic Cities, Integrating Nature into Urban Design and Planning

March 7, 2017

  The “greening” of cities can focus on everything except nature, emphasizing such elements as public transit, renewable energy production, and energy efficient building systems. While these are important aspects of reimagining urban living, human beings have an innate need to connect with the natural world (the biophilia hypothesis). And any vision of a sustainable urban […]

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