Climate Change is in our Business: Urbanization and Economic Growth in the 21st Century

by Kristina Byrne on November 26, 2012

Originally aired November 15,2012, Co-produced by Abt Associates

Exploring the concept of sustainable development, the session outlines the changing face of competitiveness in light of challenges posed by climate change and urbanization.  The discussion looks at the business case for municipal planning to incorporate sustainability and the effects of green jobs for the labor market, and outlines the incentives for businesses, from small enterprises to large corporations to make sustainability a part of company policy.

 Constantin Abarbieritei, Abt Associates’ Division Vice President, International Economic Growth, moderates a panel of experts,  including:ssf urban econ dev

  • Dr. Marc A. Weiss, Chairman and CEO of Global Urban Development (GUD), an international policy organization and professional network of 600 leaders and experts in 60 countries. GUD works worldwide on Metropolitan Economic Strategy and Sustainable Economic Development. Marc co-authored Sustainable Economic Development Strategies.
  • Michele Laird, Principal Associate with Abt Associates in the International Economic Growth Division, directs the USAID-funded Mexico Competitiveness Program, which works at the policy and institutional level, promoting private sector innovation, advancement of climate change mitigation and adaptation actions, and improvement in governance, in order to increase competitiveness sustainably.
  • Dr. Djordjija Petkoski, Senior Fellow at the Zicklin Center, Wharton Business School, following a 20 year World Bank career, brings global expertise in competitiveness and sustainable development at the national and corporate levels. He has taught, lectured, and published extensively on on business and development issues, competitiveness and sustainable development, anti-corruption, governance, corporate responsibility, climate change, ethics, leadership and leading change.
  • Dr. Mathew Forstater, Full Professor of Economics, University of Missouri—Kansas City, and Founding Director, Center for Full Employment and Price Stability, and a Research Associate at the Levy Economics Institute of Bard College.  He has served as an economic advisor in a variety of contexts, including crucial work in the aftermath of Argentina’s financial crisis, and has written and referreed extensively on green jobs.

register for FREE access to this session and all of SSF’s archives!

 

Be Sociable with SSF, Share!
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Delicious
  • email
  • Tumblr

{ 4 comments… read them below or add one }

Patrick H. Hays December 1, 2012 at 12:27 pm

I would like to listen to previous sessions and have access to SSF’s archives.

Reply

Kristina Byrne December 6, 2012 at 8:28 am

For access to SSF archives, register for a free membership

Reply

Susana April 23, 2014 at 7:33 pm

I will also like to say that most people that find tsevhelmes devoid of health insurance are typically students, self-employed and people who are without a job. More than half from the uninsured are really under the age of Thirty-five. They do not think they are in need of health insurance since they are young and healthy. Their particular income is usually spent on real estate, food, along with entertainment. A lot of people that do represent the working class either entire or part-time are not offered insurance by means of their work so they move without due to rising price of health insurance in the us. Thanks for the tips you discuss through this site.

Reply

Holt April 24, 2014 at 5:54 am

Hey I am so excited I found your blog, I ralley found you by accident, while I was browsing on Yahoo for something else, Anyways I am here now and would just like to say thank you for a tremendous post and a all round thrilling blog (I also love the theme/design), I don’t have time to browse it all at the minute but I have book-marked it and also added your RSS feeds, so when I have time I will be back to read a great deal more, Please do keep up the great work.

Reply

Leave a Comment

{ 1 trackback }

Previous post:

Next post: