Webinar: Ending Energy Poverty

by Arturo Herrera on April 24, 2017

Global electrification reached 85.3% in 2014, however, over 1 billion people still do not have electricity and more than 2.7 billion people are without clean cooking facilities. What has worked in developing nations to increase access to modern energy services, how can affordable energy deployment be accelerated and how can the social, cultural, geopolitical and educational barriers be overcome?

Clark Miller moderated the session. Clark is Senior Sustainability Scientist in the Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability and Associate Professor, School for the Future of Innovation in Society at ASU. As part of the ASU LightWorks leadership team, he coordinates social science, humanities, and policy research on energy transitions, seeking to understand the social dynamics and societal implications of large-scale changes in energy systems.

Ending Energy Poverty from Security & Sustainability Forum on Vimeo.

Panelists:

Clark Miller will moderate the session. Clark is a Senior Sustainability Scientist in the Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability and Associate Professor, School for the Future of Innovation in Society at ASU.  As part of the ASU LightWorks leadership team, he coordinates social science, humanities, and policy research on energy transitions, seeking to understand the social dynamics and societal implications of large-scale changes in energy systems.
Kartikeya Singh is deputy director of the Wadhwani Chair in U.S.-India Policy Studies at CSIS. His research interests include climate change and energy policy, innovation, and the geopolitics of energy use. His work has allowed him to field-test and deploy clean energy technologies, including electric vehicles and off-grid solar solutions in India and Uganda.
Joy Clancy is a Professor in Development Studies specializing in Gender at the University of Twene. Her research has focused, for more than 30 years, on small scale energy systems for developing countries, including the technology transfer process and the role that energy plays as an input for small businesses and the potential it offers entrepreneurs, particularly women, through the provision of a new infrastructure service.

Alon Abramson is the Program Manager at the Philadelphia Energy Authority where he oversees the Energy Campaign, a 10-year, $1 billion program to make energy cleaner and more affordable for low income households, small businesses, municipal buildings, and schools in Philadelphia. Alon brings a background in best practices and policy for implementing energy efficiency programs in urban communities from his work at the Penn Institute for Urban Research at the University of Pennsylvania.

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