Food Security in an Urbanizing World

by Kristina Byrne on September 6, 2012

Food Security in an Urbanizing World

Originally aired September 5, 2012, Co-produced with Abt Associates
Highlighting challenges due to current food system shortcomings and the added pressure of a growing population, the session showcases existing work in the field and presents overarching research questions on the effects of climate change that are of particular concern to cities and food security.  From livestock pathology to obesity, the discussion covers economic, health and equity issues relating to food production and distribution.
  • Constantin Abarbieritei, Abt Associates’ Division Vice President, International Economic Growth, moderates.
  • Dr. Charles Godfray, Oxford’s Hope Professor of Zoology and Director of the Martin Programme on the Future of Food, was a Lead Expert in the UK Government Office for Science’s Foresight project, which published The Future of Farming: Challenges and Choices for Global Sustainability.  He discusses food system dynamics.
  • Dr. Alan Kelly, Dean Emeritus, Department of Pathobiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, is co-editor of Food Security in a Global Economy, a volume about public health and veterinary medicine and public health.  He presents about sustainable intensification and the importance of context: China, India, and the African continent.
  • Ed Keturakis, an agribusiness specialist and agricultural consultant to USAID, has experience developing projects in over 10 countries, including agribusiness value chain development, post conflict agricultural recovery, and agribusiness and food processing development.  He speaks about the conceptual framework and analysis of food systems and the four pillars of food security.

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