Seeing the Better City

by Arturo Herrera on January 30, 2017

 Personal observation remains as important as ever to understand and improve cities today. While big data, digital mapping, and simulated cityscapes are valuable tools for understanding urban space, using them without on-the-ground, human impressions risks creating places that do not reflect authentic local context. Join SSF and Island Press in a webinar featuring Charles Wolfe, practicing Seattle land use/environmental attorney and Affiliate Associate Professor in the College of Built Environments at the University of Washington and renowned urbanism writer.

Seeing the Better City – Clip with Chuck Wolfe from Security & Sustainability Forum on Vimeo.

Seeing the Better City/Charles R. Wolfe/Island Press

 

Chuck is the author of “Seeing the Better City“, which focuses on the sights, sounds, and experiences of place in order to craft policies, plans, and regulations to shape better urban environments.   Watch this 3-minute video of Chuck explaining the value of personal observation urban planning. 

PANELISTS

Join the Security and Sustainability Forum and Island Press in an urban planning and design webinar featuring Charles Wolfe, practicing Seattle land use/environmental attorney and Affiliate Associate Professor in the College of Built Environments at the University of Washington. Chuck is the author of “Seeing the Better City“, which focuses on the sights, sounds, and experiences of place in order to craft policies, plans, and regulations to shape better urban environments.

 Lynn Richards, President and CEO of the Congress for the New Urbanism is also on the panel. Previously, Lynn had a long and distinguished career at the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), holding multiple leadership roles over 13 years including Acting Director and Policy Director in the Office of Sustainable Communities.  Lynn helped break down roadblocks and coordinate funding among HUD, DOT, EPA and other agencies that affect the built and natural environment
 The webinar was moderated by Tom Mayes, Vice President and General Counsel at the National Trust for Historic Preservation.  A recipient of the National Endowment for the Arts Rome Prize in Historic Preservation from the American Academy in Rome, Tom recently published a series of essays about why old places matter to people.  He has written and spoken widely about historic house museums, preservation, and preservation law.
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